Null Set Principle: Philosophical Post

Hi. Khiyali again. (I seem to be doing a lot of posts lately!) You probably don’t know it, but I like to be a Philosopher sometimes.  While I was being one in the bathroom just now, I thought this up.  Please forget you read this intro, because it seems more professional that way. Thanks!
 

Null set: Definition:

A set in which there is nothing, i.e. a philosophical post on this blog was a null set, before this post.  Before Kalpana Chawla, an Indian Woman Astronaut was a null set.

Null Set: Principle (simple):

What if there were no null sets? What if there was something in every category possible?   Well, then a null set would be a null set!                                                                                             ∴* It is impossible to have no null sets.

Null Set: Principle (complex):

What if there were no null sets?  What if there was something in every category possible?   Well, then a null set would be a null set!   But then there would be a null set, so there would be something in every category possible! But then a null set would be a null set!  So then a null set would be a null set again…
And it keeps repeating like that forever!!!!!
∴* It is impossible to have no null sets for more than half of the time! 

Q.E.D.    

*therefore

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This entry was posted in By Khiyali, philosophy and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink.

6 Responses to Null Set Principle: Philosophical Post

  1. Vinay Bhat says:

    This is so wonderful Khiyali! Loved it. I am wondering if there is any other way of proving this as well (without using contradiction). Need to think about it.

    Love,
    Vinay

  2. Vinay Bhat says:

    Another way of saying this would be nothing of anything is everything. very interesting thought indeed

  3. rpillala says:

    I don’t think it matters if we can find an example of a set with no elements. The idea of the empty set exists, whether or not it is useful to us. In fact, in math we refer to the empty set as THE empty set, not as a type of set that has no members. There is only one set with no elements. It would be like saying that the roman numeral I and and the Hindu-Arabic numeral 1 are different numbers. They are different drawings, but they represent the same number.

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